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As a nonprofit, full-service financial institution, part of our mission is to provide financial education so you can feel confident that you're making informed financial decisions.

 

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Aug 6

2014

A recent data breach estimates that 1.2 billion user names and passwords have been compromised from more than 420,000 websites. In addition, it is estimated that more than 500 million email addresses were also compromised. At this time, these compromised websites have not been identified.

 

Pacific Service CU has no reason to believe that our online or mobile banking systems were part of the breach. However, many of our members may have been exposed through other website relationships. As a precaution, we advise you to change your password for all of the websites that you visit, especially your financial and banking sites.

 

Hold Security, the firm that discovered the theft, says the thieves aren’t in the business of stealing bank account information. That said, it’s a good time to remember to be cautious and aware about potential scams.

 

Here’s how a potential scam might work:
Phishing and vishing are types of deception to obtain sensitive personal information. An email is sent mimicking the appearance and identity of a company where you shop or have a relationship. The email may request that you update your account information, a credit card number or a password. Do not click any links and delete the email.

 

Another scam possibility is that your email or social media accounts will be hacked and used to send emails to your contact list advertising bogus products. If you receive a suspicious email from someone you know, it is likely that they have been hacked. Do not click any of the links and delete the email.

 

Fraudulent emails could avoid spam filters because they are targeted to known customers or contacts, which could result in a greater likelihood that their attempts will be successful in convincing consumers to respond.

 

Here’s what you can do:

  • Remember that the credit union will never contact you via phone, email or text message requesting passwords, log in information, account number, social security number or any other personal information.

  • Don’t respond to unknown solicitations and don’t give your personal information to unknown people or companies. If you’re suspicious about an email you’ve received, you should visit the company’s website directly by inputing the URL or using a bookmark.

  • Use a different password for each site that you visit. If hackers can access one account, they can access all the accounts with the same credentials.
  • Try a password manager. We recommend using a secure password manager that stores all of your passwords. Apps include Password Box, LastPass, MSecure and eWallet.
  • Change your password every quarter.
  • Use a complex password with a combination of upper case, lower case, numbers and symbols.
  • Watch your account statements for any signs of suspicious activity.
  • Set up account alerts for your financial relationships to alert you when there is activity on your account. You can do this for your credit union account by logging into BranchLine and clicking on the Manage Profile>Manage Alerts tab.
  • Keep your computer’s firewall turned on and keep your operating system, anti-spyware and anti-virus software up to date.
  • Report suspicious activity and suspected phishing attempts to the company being impersonated.

 
You may also be interested in:
Federal Trade Commission – a good resource for identity theft and current scams
Credit Report – new laws allow a credit report per consumer per year

Apr 9

2014

A new bug has infiltrated the internet. Heartbleed is a flaw in OpenSSL, the open-source encryption standard used by the majority of websites that need to transmit data users want to keep secure. It basically provides a secure connection when interacting with websites or sending email.

 

The bug opened the opportunity for hackers to access encrypted passwords, messages, and possibly other sensitive information.

 

The credit union has checked all of our online processing systems for this vulnerability and are pleased to report that we have NOT been impacted by the Heartbleed Bug. All of our online systems are secure and regularly tested to ensure they have NOT been breached or compromised.

 

Tips for protecting yourself:

Change your passwords for important sites – but, be sure to confirm with the service provider that they have not been compromised or that they have a fix in place BEFORE you change your password. Since we were not affected, you do NOT have to change your password for BranchLine or mobile banking, but you may do so if desired.

 

Keep a close eye on financial statements from all providers – because attackers may be able to access a server’s memory for credit card information, it is a good idea to watch for unfamiliar charges on your statements. You can view current PSCU transactions through BranchLine.

 

Check with other businesses that have your data – to make sure they are secure. While large companies know about the problem, smaller companies may not be aware, or as proactive as large companies to implement a fix.

 

Read more

 

For more information, please call a member service representative at (888) 858-6878.

Apr 1

2014

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Great news!  If you’re tightening your budget or even just trying to save a little money – we’ve got a great deal for you.

 

Give your finances a workout by trimming high-rate credit cards with a no-cost balance transfer. It’s the easy way to save money on interest and lower your monthly payments.

 

For a limited time, we’re offering  1% cash back on Visa balance transfers.  Our Visa Platinum Card features no annual fee, no balance transfer fee and no cash advance fee – now that’s a great deal!

 

When you transfer your credit card balances from another lender to your Pacific Service CU Visa Platinum Card by June 30, 2014, we’ll give you 1% cash back—up to $100.

 

It’s easy to take advantage of this special cash back offer. Apply online for an instant loan decision or call a member service representative at (888) 858-6878.  We’re ready to help.

 

Mar 26

2014

by Michelle, Assistant Vice President, Operations

by Michelle, Assistant Vice President, Operations

A recent scam affecting consumers involves fraud artists gaining access to your home computer to steal private information, data and files.

 

Here’s how it works.

A fraudster calls you on the phone claiming to be a Microsoft technical support employee. They may offer to speed up your computer, troubleshoot any performance issues or help you upgrade your software. With your cooperation, they dial in to your computer, which gives them access to your files.

 

Once they are logged into your computer, they can:

Install malicious software or spyware to capture personal and financial information, including user names and passwords.

 

Control your computer remotely, even after they claim to have logged off and after your phone call has ended.

 

Instruct you to access fraudulent websites that collect personal and financial information.

 

Additionally, at the end of the call, these scammers may attempt to collect your credit card information to charge you for their time and services.

 

In response to these scams, Microsoft has stated, “Neither Microsoft nor our partners make unsolicited phone calls (also known as cold calls) to charge you for computer security or software fixes.”

 

Do not trust unsolicited callers claiming to provide computer services. If a caller claiming to represent Microsoft contacts you, do not purchase any software or services from them. Most importantly, do not give them control of your computer.

 

As always, we encourage you to trust your instincts and never provide personal information to strangers.

 

If you suspect that your account has been compromised, immediately call a member service representative at (888) 858-6878. After hours, for debit or credit card fraud, please call (800) 543-5073 to block your card.

 

We can cancel compromised cards, change your account number or add a password to your account for future transactions if it becomes necessary.

 

 

Mar 17

2014

Great news!  If you’re tightening your budget or simply like to save money – we’ve got a great deal for you.

 

Let us try to save you money on your auto loan with 1% cash back – up to $300, no payments for 90 days and a rate as low as 2.24% APR.

 

1% Cash Back
For a limited time, we’ll give you a 1% cash rebate when you refinance a loan from another lender to us – up to $300. That’s right, you’ll get cash in your pocket today and monthly savings for the rest of your term.

 

No payments for 90 days
Better yet, you’ll have the option to not make a payment for 90 days.

 

Simple Process
Give us a phone call and a few minutes and we’ll add up just how much we can lower your monthly payment and how much that will save over the life of the loan. Or, try our online Loan Saver Calculator to add up your savings.

 

Receive an instant loan decision online or call a friendly member service representative at (888) 858-6878.

 

Hurry, this special 1% rebate offer expires June 30, 2014 See complete offer details.

 
   
 
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SECURITY NOTIFICATION
For website security purposes and to ensure that access to the Pacific Service Credit Union (PSCU) website remains available to all users, PSCU may enable the use of software programs to monitor and record network traffic to identify unauthorized attempts to upload or change information or otherwise cause damage. Unauthorized attempts to upload information or change information on this website and any other illegal activities are strictly prohibited, may be reported to law enforcement agencies and may be punishable under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986 and Title 18 U.S.C. Sec.1001 and 1030.
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